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Printing An Ean13 Code In Correct Size

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    Gene Henson
    The X-dimension setting of a bar code specifies the width of the bar code. This in fact adjusts the number of dots a printer uses for the width of the narrowest element of the bar code. All other bars of greater width grow in ratio to the narrowest bar as you expand the bar code's width.

    The size of the dot and the X-dimension are determined by the selected printer's resolution. A dot represents the size of the smallest mark the printer can print. Each step in the X-dimension increases the narrowest element by a single dot of the printer. The printer resolution is important because it's impossible to increase the narrowest elements by fractions of a dot. It can only increase by a full extra dot. Of course all wider bar code elements grow in ratio to this.

    For example if the narrow element is 1 dot wide and the widest element is 10, when we increase the X-dimension by 1, so that the narrow element is 2, the widest element will now be 20. This accounts for the "jumping" in the bar code's width when you increase the X-dimension. The higher the resolution of the printer, the smaller these steps will be, because the size of a single dot will be smaller.

    We do not advise that you try working around this physical limitation of the printer by exporting the bar code object as a graphic and then importing it back into your label as a picture object. Although a picture object can be scaled to any dimension desired, it will result in a poor quality bar code and may be unreadable for a bar code scanner.

    BarTender allows you to specify the target x-dimension of your barcode. This feature can be found in the properties of the barcode in the barcode tab. Click on the Wizard button to the right of X Dimension. This feature still requires the printer to support the target x-dimension size of your barcode.

    Pasted from <[url="http://www.seagullscientific.com/aspx/FAQ.aspx"]http://www.seagullscientific.com/aspx/FAQ.aspx[/url]>
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    Legacy Poster
    [quote name='Gene H - Seagull Support' timestamp='1314918705' post='493']
    The printer resolution is important because it's impossible to increase the narrowest elements by fractions of a dot
    [/quote]

    So basically we would need to upgrade our 203dpi printers to 300dpi to achieve our goal of a perfect sized barcode?
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  • Avatar
    Legacy Poster
    [quote name='eaus' timestamp='1314950001' post='494']
    So basically we would need to upgrade our 203dpi printers to 300dpi to achieve our goal of a perfect sized barcode?
    [/quote]

    To confirm this is a solution for you, install a "dummy" printer to your computer using a 300dpi driver. Any of Seagull's drivers will work if they are for a 300 DPI printer (Zebra GX430T, Zebra ZM400 (300dpi) etc.) If you select this dummy printer while designing labels, you can resize your Barcodes based on it's resolution.

    However, I have a question for Seagull techs: I realize the reason for the mil size limitations mentioned in this thread while re-sizing barcodes horizontally. But, theoretically, shouldn't we be able to make barcodes any size while designing them in ladder style? This position of the barcode is not limited to specific DPI limitations.
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